Wednesday, April 19, 2017

New Acquisition: Personal Library Catalogue of Prominent Nineteenth-Century NYC Lawyer


page from Hawkin's catalog listed his law books Bound in beautiful Morocco, this catalogue highlights the intellectual pursuits of Dexter A. Hawkins, one of the founders of the preeminent New York City firm Hawkins Delafield & Wood LLP. Originally from New England, Hawkins opened up his practice at 10 Wall Street after reading law with Maine lawyer William Pitt Fessenden and completing his studies at Harvard Law School. The firm quickly expanded and became known for its specialty--governmental finance.

Hawkins detailed his impressive collection in meticulous script, organized by subject matter as laid out in an indexed table of contents. Notable titles from his law collection include:

  • Code Napoleon. Paris, 1809.
  • Vattel’s Law of Nations. Philadelphia, 1861.
  • Charters for City of New York, proposed by Committee of Seventy. 1872.
  • Webster's Speeches and Forensic Arguments. Boston, 1830.

His library enumerates several titles related to international law, as well as U.S. constitutional history and legal commentary. He also had a penchant for Greek, Roman, and American history, as well as illustrated works and texts on education, a subject for which Hawkins was famous as a promoter of free, nonsectarian public schools. Relatedly, Hawkins appears to be well-versed in foreign language, indicating volumes on the languages of Greek, French, Spanish, and German.

Sources: The Lawbook Exchange and website of Hawkins Delafield & Wood LLP

This post was written by Lauren Koster, BC Law Class of 2019. 

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

New exhibit on view--Robert Morris: Lawyer & Activist


Cover of Robert Morris exhibit catalog We are pleased to announce the opening of the spring exhibit in the Law Library's Daniel R. Coquillette Rare Book Room. Curated by Mary Bilder and Laurel Davis, the exhibit is entitled "Robert Morris: Lawyer & Activist".

Morris (1823-1882), long known as one of the first African-American lawyers in the country, was a mover and shaker in Boston anti-slavery circles but also a full-throated civil rights activist in many other areas. He also had a fascinating relationship with Boston's Irish community and a very young Boston College.

All books in the exhibit belonged to Morris and are here on generous loan from Boston College's John J. Burns Library. Additionally, the Boston Athenaeum kindly loaned multiple items from their Robert Morris papers. Through his books and papers, we were able to explore Morris's many dimensions.

For a sneak peek, take a look at the online exhibit!

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Competition

The Legal History and Rare Books (LH&RB) Section of the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL), in cooperation with Cengage Learning, announces the Ninth Annual Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Competition. The competition is named in honor of Morris L. Cohen, late Professor Emeritus of Law at Yale Law School.

The competition is designed to encourage scholarship and to acquaint students with the AALL and law librarianship, and is open to students currently enrolled in accredited graduate programs in library science, law, history, and related fields. Essays may be on any topic related to legal history, rare law books, or legal archives. The winner will receive a $500.00 prize from Cengage Learning and up to $1,000 for expenses to attend this year's AALL Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas.

Winning and runner-up entries will be invited to submit their entries to Unbound, the official journal of LH&RB. Past winning essays have gone on to be accepted by journals such as N.Y.U. Law Review, American Journal of Legal History, University of South Florida Law Review, William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law, Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities, and French Historical Review.

The entry form and instructions are available at the LH&RB website: www.aallnet.org/sections/lhrb/awards. Entries must be submitted by 11:59 p.m., April 17, 2017 (EDT).

Monday, January 9, 2017

New acquisition: 1613 edition of Justinian's Institutes

title page of justinian's institutes
The main focus of our collection is English and early American law books, but thanks to gifts by Professors Daniel R. Coquillette and Michael Hoeflich, we also have a strong collection of Roman law books. This new acquisition is a 1613 Venice edition of Justinian's Institutes, the synopsis of the Roman legal system that was designed to instruct law students. It's a key piece of the body of Roman law known as the Corpus Juris Civilis, organized and preserved by Emperor Justinian in the 6th century. 

text of justinian's institutes, with glossThis edition was edited and annotated by Silvestro Aldobrandini (1499 — 1558), a Florentine legal expert. It features red and black printing on the title page and woodcut initials throughout. As it typical in Roman law books, the original text is printed in the center, with the gloss (or commentary) and other annotations printed around it.